Well, “Thats It!”

I met a Muslim man who was said to be the font of all religious knowledge for a group of Palestinians in Melbourne. I asked him if the time of Ramadan was placed like the time of Easter was over seasonal times of celebration and the moon phases. His answer?

“It is what it is and THATS IT!”

Luckily others I met were less rigid. He was known to us after that simply as Mr Thatsit.

I am thinking his type of person has started to take over the world…..but I wont let myself go that far. It does look like the last nail in the coffin that was Yarmouk, Damascus has been nailed this week.

At the end of this post I have included a video posted yesterday which shows IS moving through the Yarmouk Palestinian refugee area yelling “Takfir.” There is no doubt that the beautiful piano man in the video below has gone and any smiles disappeared under Al Nusra and now their ‘friends’ the IS or as they are all known to the locals Da’ash. First the piano man……………

Read the electronic intifada article here

But that’s all gone now as on April Fools Day, 6 days ago, Al Yarmouk, once the largest area housing Palestinian Refugees in Syria,  was overrun by IS. Not that the Nusrats were any better, in fact it is believed it was them that ushered IS in through the corridor streets to Yarmouk. The name Al Yarmouk in Arabic means literally, “The Camp”. Just 8ks from the centre of the once beautiful city of Damascus. Yarmouk was, until late 2011, a thriving metropolitan suburb.

Then in 2011, things started to crack. We were told the war in Syria was a result of the so-called Arab Spring, people inside Syria wanting ‘Regime Change.’ The so-called Free Syrian Army (Moderates?!) were intent of removing a ‘corrupt regime’ and ‘instituting democratic reform’. It was clear then that these FSA Leaders were people who had not lived in the country for years. They were political exiles who did not have the support of the majority of the Syrian people. But the neo-lib and hasbura press continued to ploy us with platitudes and rhetoric to keep us dumbed down.

My first site on MSM of the now bitter and criminally insane war was in 2011. It was of unidentified uniformed snipers labelled ‘Assad regime forces,’ shooting western guns (?) at demonstrators in Deraa from behind a low brick wall…..remind anyone of past covert regime change ‘interventions’? When things got hotter we were ‘informed’ by MSM that the fight was a ‘Civil War,’ ‘fuelled by sectarian interests’. This in a country where Christians still made wine, Muslims were quietly accepting of their various typology and even included around 20,000 Israeli Jews who entered when the Golan Heights were taken by Israel.

Palestinians generally wanted to stay non-aligned, many making this declaration on-line. But Palestinians and their cause is always a international hot potato. They were about to be forced to chose. We saw the Palestinians drawn into a War that they on the whole did not see as theirs. They generally supported the government of Bashar Al Assad who had clearly supported them in the past and this was not their War, but it was closing in on them.

Palestinian refugees in Syria over 18years old do compulsory military service in the PLA (Palestinian Army in Syria) for 18 months, trained by the PLA with  Syrian army weapons and facilities. The PLA was also based in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan and Lebanon with mandates to cooperate with their hosts. Now, the Syrian PLA base is the only one in the entire Arab world. Between January and July 2012, seven organised assassinations were carried out on senior military PLA  members. My brother in law was shot under such circumstances and no doubt other similar lesser ranked soldiers died in in the same way. On 2nd August 2012, a visiting reporter to Yarmouk, Sharmine Narwani (nsnbc), talked to residents following the first major mortar attack on the suburb which killed 20 people.

Foreign media headlines suggested the Syrian government was shelling Yarmouk, but Palestinians inside expressed doubt. Some said these were rebel mortars from adjacent neighborhoods, but it was clear nobody could provide definitive answers for what may simply have been a series of stray shells…. Yarmouk, once home to around a million Syrians and 160,000 Palestinian refugees, was an oasis of calm that summer day of my visit. By contrast, driving through rebel-occupied Tadamoun, Yalda and Hajar al-Aswad on my way in and out of the camp, one could only gape at the burned buildings and vehicles, shuttered shops, rubble in the streets and makeshift checkpoints dotting these new conflict zones.

Attacks inside Yarmouk began with snipers and mortars from neighbouring suburbs, people began to disappear for ransom or just disappear for ever. People knew there was a strong push from Saudi Arabia to ‘change the state of play in Syria and that their money fed the so called ‘insurgents’ who were no more than mercenaries. PFLP leader Ahmad Jabril was clearly behind Al Assad, and left Yarmouk for his own protection, internal cracks began to show. People who remained inside the camp were divided. Thousands of Islamist fighters invaded and occupied Yarmouk on December 17, 2012 In Dec 2012 it was reported that…

All of the camp is under the control of the (rebel) Free Syrian Army,” said a Palestinian activist in Yarmouk. He said clashes had stopped and the remaining PFLP-GC fighters retreated to join Assad’s forces massed on the northern edge of the camp. The stories these fighters tell me is nothing I have read in English, or in any mainstream publication outside Syria. Theirs is a story that is black-and-white. Thousands of Islamist fighters invaded and occupied Yarmouk on December 17, 2012, and Palestinians and Syrians alike fled the camp, literally beginning the next day. see here

At this time most people left Yarmouk, for other Damascan suburbs or moved outside the country predominantly to Lebanon, and onto Europe if they could. In 2013 their fears were even more realised when it became clearer that return to their homes was, if ever possible, a very long way off. Jabat Al Nusra became entrenched in Yarmouk, after yo-yoing in and out due to local fighter efforts and government force attacks.

The militants, they say, systematically destroyed the camp, killed people, looted homes, hospitals – anything they could get their hands on. They insist that the rebels could not have captured Yarmouk without the help of Hamas, and are convinced that Hamas supporters are still inside the camp, now members of Al-Nusra Front, AknafBeit al-Maqdes, Ohdat al-Omariyya, Ahrar al-Yarmouk, Zahrat al Mada’en and other rebel groups that they say occupy the camp. They claim Hamas employed and provided financial assistance to displaced Syrians who escaped conflict elsewhere and settled in Yarmouk. “They hired them for this conflict,” says one. The finger-pointing at Hamas persists throughout all my conversations with refugees in the three separate camps I visit in Syria. While all Hamas officials exited the country early on in the conflict, the fact remains that many Palestinians affiliated with Hamas did not. On the outside, we understand Hamas is not there, but within the camps, Palestinians identify the individuals they accuse of sedition as “Hamas people.” This blurred line has provided Hamas’ political leadership with ‘plausible deniability’ against accusations that it has aided Islamist rebels in the camps. The fuzzy lines first became clear to me in the autumn of 2011 when a Hamas official confided that they had to “remove some people” from these areas who were displaying increasing sympathy with the Syrian opposition.

See complete article here The same journalist that reported the situation (above) returned in March 2014.

A year-and-a-half later, in March 2014, I visited Yarmouk again. The camp is unrecognizable now, and the pictures we see don’t do justice to the damage. At the entrance of the camp, I was greeted by armed Palestinians who are part of a 14-group ‘volunteer force’ formed for the purpose of protecting Yarmouk and ejecting the rebel fighters deep inside the camp. The group falls under the umbrella of the Popular Palestinian Committees for the Liberation of Yarmouk. When I ask them where they’re from, in rapid-fire, one after the other, they tell me,“Safad, Lubya, Haifa, Tiberias, Jerusalem, Acca,” though, of course, they’re too young to ever have been to any of these places. That’s where their parents or grandparents hail from. That’s where they intend to return one day. There’s a lone Syrian among them. He was raised in Yarmouk and is a Palestinian as far as he’s concerned. The stories these fighters tell me is nothing I have read in English, or in any mainstream publication outside Syria. Theirs is a story that is black-and-white.

On 24th Dec 2014, Palestinian Fatah leader Mohammad Ahmad Tarawiya was shot and killed in Yarmouk

The assassination of Tarawiya happened at sustained attempts, since 2012, to target Palestinian refugee camps and to weaken Palestinian factions in Syria which are among the strongest of the progressive and pan-Arabist Palestinian resistance fronts. The assassination also happens against the backdrop of disputes within Palestine’s Fatah movement itself. Within Yarmouk itself, there have been armed rivalries between Hamas and foreign-backed insurgents on one side, and Fatah, the Palestine Liberation Army (PLA), the PFLP-GC and other progressive as well as rejectionist factions on the other since 2012. While it is still uncertain who the masked gunmen that shot Tarawiya were, or on whose behalf they acted, it is certain that Tarawiya had both foreign and Palestinian foes.”

See source here This is what is there now, please check it, watching these guys manoeuvre through empty suburban streets is eerie…………………………………

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=870_1428256142

Ahmad Jebril said in 2012 if Yarmouk falls Damascus falls, I hope he was wrong. Enough people have suffered and 3500 children remain in Yarmouk. No playschool, dancing or piano classes for them.

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